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 Kostohryz -- Rydel:  Looking Back 400 Years
http://kostohryz.tripod.com/genealogy/history.html

Background of Research results by Czech Rebublic Researcher, Martin Pytr

As you scroll down, you will see that there are three separate sections:
Rydel and Barton Section, Janota Section , and Kostohryz section.

Rydel and Barton Section

Your ancestors and their relatives were village people: farmers, cottagers, blacksmiths, fojts (see below) and farm laborers. They lived in Hodslavice, Bludovice, Zvilina, Zvivotice and Za’visvice, villages beneath Beskydy hills, district Novy’ Jicvi’n, Moravia. In Hodslavice and Zavisice lived mostly Czech speaking inhabitants but in Bludovice, Zilina and Zivotice lived mostly German speaking population. Mixtured marriages were relative often as you will see.

The mentioned villages are situated beneath Moravian-Silesian Beskydy Mountains, a range of the Carpathians.
Though the area is known for its natural beauty, it traditionally has been difficult to earn a living from the rocky mountain soil. This hard social situation of people living there, made them to think about emigration.
First written note about Hodslavice and surrounded villages is dated 1411. In the area of today’s Hodslavice were originaly 2 villages – Hodslavice and Rohlina. The last written note about Rohlina is dated 1586. Later was incorporated to Hodslavice.

By the confession were your ancestors protestants.
After Thirty Years War (1618-1648) were prohibited all non-catholic confessions on the area Bohemia and Moravia. Czech Brethren had to left country or to convert to catholic confession. But some families converted only formally and stayed  protestants in reality.
In this situation were also protestants in the mentioned villages. After proclamation of Edict of Tolerance (signed on 13 October 1781 by the Emperor Joseph II.) were Lutheran and Calvinist confessions allowed.  Czech Brethren and others were allowed later after WWI and birth of Czechoslovakia. Till the times, Czech protestants chosen Lutheran or Calvinist confession.
Shortly after proclamation of Edict of Tolerance, protestants from Hodslavice and surrounded villages proclaimed themselves as as Evangelics of Augsburg Confession (Lutherans).

Before proclamation of Edict of Tolerance, protestants of Hodslavice practicised their belief secretly. Part of Hodslavice forest is until today called Cvtenice (place of reading). Hidden in the forest they were reading and singing from the books. The books were their heritage after ancestors or were illegaly smuggled from protestant countries (Prussia, Silesia or Hungary).
It is a historical paradox that Silesia and Hungary were the parts of the same Empire controlled by the Hapsburgs as well as Bohemia and Moravia. But the historical reasons made another political status for Hungary and Silesia, therefore protestant confession were tolerated there.
After proclamation of Edict of Tolerance, the first protestant pastors came to Bohemia and Moravia from Hungary, mostly from Slovakia (until 1918, the part of Hungary). The first pastors in Hodslavice were also Slovaks.
One of them, Antonin Stur was a nephew of the famous Slovakian revolutionary patriot Ludovit Stur.

Occupations of your ancestors (and their godparents)

FARMER
Sedlak in Czech, Bauer or Grundbesitzer in German, rusticus in Latin. Farmers were also sorted by the area of the field (1 hide-, half hide- and quarter-hide-sized farmers)

COTTAGER
Chalupnik in Czech, Chaluppner in German, gazarius or domunculator in Latin.
Soil used by him was smaller than quarter of hide.

RYCHTAR
Rychtar, sometimes also fojt or soltys in Czech, Richter, Vogt or Schultheiss in German, scultetus or advocatus in Latin. The simple equivalent in English does not exist, therefore is often translated as a judge, mayor, reeve or bailiff.
All of it terms partly describing the meaning of the word RYCHTAR.
RYCHTARs (fojts etc.) were not elected for the authority. They inherited or bought it. When he inherited it he was written in German records also as Erbrichter.
In the head of  village were 1 fojt, purkmistr (1-2) and about 5 aldermen.

RYCHTARs house was called RYCHTA (or FOJTSTVI). RYCHTARs were very often the only ones in village with permission to have a pub. Therefore a lot of pubs in Czech villages are called NA RYCHTE or NA FOJTSTVI (at rychta, at fojtstvi) still.

Searching in vital registers

The oldest (catholic) vital registers of Hodslavice where I searched for your ancestors were vital registers of parishment Stramberk (1628-1689). Unfortunately in this register are only the bird records no weding or death ones. In 1689 was established new parishment at Zivotice. Vital registers of Zivotice includes all the kinds of records – birth, wedding and death. But some parts of birth records for village Zivotice are missed. Catholic parishment of Hodslavice was established in 1784.
After 1781 was established also protestant parishment there.
The oldest vital registers of Bludovice where I searched for your ancestors were vital registers of parishment Novy Jicin.
During my work I often used catholic vital registers also for searching data after 1781.
The reason was that birth (and also wedding and death) records of protestants were written until 1848 not only in protestant vital registers but had to be written also in catholic ones. For researching was better to use catholic vital registers what included indexes.
The vital registers were written in Latin, somewhen in Czech or in German.
I translated the German (and Czech) written records to English. Some of the oldest vital records I quoted in Latin written original because I supposed that could be interesting for you.

Numbers of  houses

In the time of Emperor Joseph II. this numbers introduced 1770 first. If a village/town had a chapel or church in 1770 they might have used that as a starting point for numbering but then you would expect the house numbers to follow one another in some sort of order.
Some houses were built between the old farms and needed also new numbers.
 

The origin of the surnames and various forms of spelling

This surnames is written in vital registers in various form of spelling. The spelling could be different but pronunciation was always the same. Reason is that some records is written in Latin, another in German and Czech.

Similar situation is spelling of firstnames.
Example:
Person who was born as Joannes (written in Latin), later had married as Johann (written in German)
and died as Jan (written in Czech).  There exists more similar situations Georg-Georius-Jiri (Jura),
Franz-Franciscus-Frantisek, Marina (Maryna)=Marianna, Pavel-Paul, Venceslaus-Wenzel-Vaclav etc.

Ancient spelling, Modern spelling, Meaning
Adam Adam Originated from given name ADAM
Barton, Barthon, Barthion Bartonv Originated from given name BARTOLOMEvJ (Bartolomew in English)In Hodslavice mentioned firstly in List of peasants dated 1558. In land records of Hodslavice is mentioned in 1645. But in vital registers of Hodslavice is not mentioned before 1676.
Bayer Bayer, Bajer Means Bavarian in German. Bavaria is a part of Germany.
Byma, Bima By’ma Originated from German word Boehm. Means man from Bohemia.
Czyp, Czypp Cvi’p Means wooden stopper (cork)  in  ancient Czech
Drzewak Drveva’k Means wooden shoe  in Czech
Horak Hora’k Means highlander  in Czech
Hromadka, Hromatka Hroma’dka Diminutive from hromada (pile), means little pile
Janek Janek Diminutive from  given name JAN (John in English)
Kramoliss, Kramolyss, Kramolisch Kramolisv Originated from ancient Czech verb kramolit (to quarrel)In Rohlina (now part of Hodslavice) is the surname mentioned firstly in List of peasants dated 1558.
Krzyzan, Krzizan, Krzyczan Krvizvan   Diminutive from  given name KRISTIA’N (Christian in English)
Kudelka, Kudielka Kudevlka Originated from ku’del (means tow or oakum in Moravian dialects). Standard Czech term is KOUDEL – white hairy material made from flax. The surname could be originated as a nickname for tow-craftsman or for person who had tow-like hair.
Meltsch Melcv German origin.
Merenda Merenda Means celebration or party  in ancient Czech, the word is originated from Italian or Latinword MERENDA (means hamper)
Monsborth ? German origin.
Neisser, Neyser, Neusser ? German origin.
Palatzky, Palatzki, Palladsky Palacky’ Means man from Palacvov (village located about 12 km from Hodslavice).The surname is firstly mentioned in 1560 at Libhosvt’, in 1589 in Novy’ Jicvi’n, 1595 in Bludovice (Matys P.)
Petrzkovsky, Petrzkowsky Petrvkovsky’ Means man from Petrvkovice (village located in surroundings of Hodslavice).The surname is firstly mentioned in 1536 at Hurka, in 1600s at Janovice, Petrvkovice, Poruba, Starojicka’ Lhota and Strani’k
Prokess Prokesv Originated from given name PROKOP
Riedel, Ridel, Rydel Ry’dl, Ry’del German origin. Diminutive from  given name RUDOLF
Sadols??? ?? I cannot recognize the name from the handwritten records in the registers.
Sedlak Sedla’k Means farmer in Czech
Skarka Svkarka ?
Sswehla Svvehla ?
Toman, Thomann Toman Originated from given name TOMA’Sv(Thomas in English)In Morvkov is the surname mentioned firstly in List of peasants dated 1558.
Turek, Tureck Turek Means Turk (ethnical name) in Czech. It was also often nickname for veterans of the war against the Ottoman Empire.



Janota Section

Your ancestors and their relatives were village people: farmers, cottagers, podsedeks and pasekars (see below) and farm laborers. They lived in Hostalkova, Katerinice, Rakova, Ratibor and Zadverice, villages in Beskydy hills, Moravia.

The mentioned villages are situated at Moravian-Silesian Beskydy Mountains, a range of the Carpathians.
Though the area (so called Moravian Valachia) is known for its natural beauty, it traditionally has been difficult to earn a living from the rocky mountain soil. This hard social situation of people living there, made them to think about emigration.

Region where your ancestors came from is called Moravske Valassko (Moravian Valachia) and the people living there are called Valasi (Valachs).
So called Valachian colonization contributed to the beginning of Moravian Valachia in 13th and 14th centuries that spread to the Slavonic part of the Carpathians from the East Carpathians of nowadays Rumania. It is not known what was the cause of this – migratory way of life Valachians or later Tartar’s invasion. The main aim was food for flocks at the typical fold way of keeping them. This aim they  reached in newly colonized montainous  areas because the original inhabitants lived mostly on more fertile lowlands. The Valachians proceed to the north and west along the Carpathian range. The montainous areas enabled better defense, strengthened self-confidence of Valachians  and supprted more freedom than the serfs had on the nobility’s lands. The Valachians were known as brave people.
The Valachians settled on part of the Carpathians in Ukraine in the 14th century. They continued to colonize northern and middle Slovakia in the first half of the 15th century. The Valachian colonization then spread through western Slovakia to Silesia and Moravia in the second half of the 15th and in 16th centuries.
They were not Rumanians but Slovaks and Ukrainians who adopted Valachian way of life and continued colonization (although they kept several words of Rumanian origin as bacva – leading shepherd, bryndza – sheep cheese etc. ). The word VALACH also changed its meaning, it gradually became the name of all breeders of fold cattle.
Moravian Valachia consists from nowadys district Vsetin and the bordering parts of district Zlin and Novy Jicin. Area of Moravian Valachia was never oficially determined. The historians tried to determine its borders according to different criteria but they caused many differences. The folding declined in the 19th century and the main differences discerning Valachia became the elements of folkish culture – the way of speech and clothing.

Your ancestral villages

Hostalkova
Village situated in okres (district) Vsetin, kraj (region) Zlin. Population 2 010.
Firstly mentioned in 1505 but it is supposed that the village was established in the 14th century.
There are buildings of chateau (rebuilt in 1848), catholic (built in 1789) and protestant (built in 1831) churches.
Census dated 1890 says that in the village lived in 339 houses 1 865 Czechs and 12 Germans.
In this times was already mentioned elementary school and post office.
In 1981 was in Hostalkova found a depot (hidden by the bandits probably) of 114 silver coins from the 16th century.

Jablunka
Village situated in okres (district) Vsetin, kraj (region) Zlin. Population 1 957.
Jablunka was established in the 16th century. The name jablunka means a little apple tree in Czech (see the COA). Village was heavy damaged by the big fire 1903.
In 1877 was built a building of protestant church there.
Census dated 1890 says that in the village lived in 151 houses 990 Czechs and 5 Germans. In this times were already mentioned elementary school, railroad station and police station.

Katerinice
Village situated in okres (district) Vsetin, kraj (region) Zlin.
Census dated 1890 says that in the village lived in 185 houses 1 100 Czech-speaking inhabitants. In this times was already mentioned elementary school.
Encyclopedy dated 1900 mentioned Katerinice as the poorest village in the Vsetin District. Inhabitants, during harvest season, were working as daily laborers in the richer lowland regions of Moravia and Austria.

Rakova
Village situated in okres (district) Zlin, kraj (region) Zlin.
Today is Rakova a part of the village Zadverice-Rakova. See the crawfish (RAK in Czech) in the COA of Zadverice-Rakova.
Census dated 1890 says that in the village lived in 54 houses 261 Czech-speaking inhabitants.

Ratibor
Village situated in okres (district) Vsetin, kraj (region) Zlin. Population 1 785.
There is building of protestant church.
Census dated 1890 says that in the village lived in 232 houses 1 408 Czechs and 5 Germans.
In this times was already mentioned elementary school.

Zadverice
Village situated in okres (district) Zlin, kraj (region) Zlin. Population 1 281 (together with Rakova).
Today is Zadverice a part of the village Zadverice-Rakova.
Firstly mentioned in 1261.
Inhabitants were often victims of war, especially Thirty Years War (1618-1648), Turkish assaults in 1660s and assaults of Hungarian rebels, 1680 and 1704-1709. Four men from Zadverice were executed for their part in Valachian uprisings.
Floods in 1891 and big fires in 1856 and 1906 heavy damaged the village.
Zadverice are well-known for traditional breeding of the horses (see the horse in the COA of Zadverice-Rakova).
In the village is building of the protestant church.
Census dated 1890 says that in the village lived in 187 houses 978 Czech-speaking inhabitants. In this times was already mentioned elementary school.

Valachian protestants

By the religion were your ancestors predominately protestants.
After Thirty Years War (1618-1648) were prohibited all non-catholic confessions on the area Bohemia and Moravia. Czech Brethren had to left country or to convert to catholic confession. But some families converted only formally and stayed  protestants in reality.
In this situation were also protestants in Moravian Valachia. After proclamation of Edict of Tolerance (signed on 13 October 1781 by the Emperor Joseph II.) were Lutheran and Calvinist confessions allowed.  Czech Brethren and others were allowed later after WWI and birth of Czechoslovakia. Till the times, Czech protestants chosen Lutheran or Calvinist confession.
Shortly after proclamation of Edict of Tolerance, protestants from Ratibor, Hostalkova and Katerinice proclaimed themselves as Evangelincs of Augsburg Confession (Lutherans), lower part of them  proclaimed themselves as Evangelincs of Helvetic Confession (Calvinists).
Lutheran parishes were established in Hostalkova and Ratibor, calvinists visited their own churches at Vsetin or Ruzdka. For protestants of Zadverice was established a calvinist church, there.
After WWI and birth of Czechoslovakia were both the protestant churches unified to Czech Brethren Church, there.
 

Occupations of your ancestors (and their godparents)

FARMER
Sedlak in Czech, Bauer or Grundbesitzer in German, rusticus in Latin. Farmers were also sorted by the area of the field (1 hide-, half hide- and quarter-hide-sized farmers). Half-hide-sized farmer – pololanik in Czech, Hablahner in German.  Quarter-hide-sized farmer – ctvrtlanik in Czech, Viertler in German

COTTAGER
Chalupnik in Czech, Chaluppner in German, gazarius or domunculator in Latin.
Soil used by him was smaller than quarter of hide.

ZAHRADNIK
Zahradnik in Czech, Gartler in German, hortulanius in Latin. His status was between farmer and cottager.
PASEKAR – originated  from Czech word PASEKA -  clearence, a cleared area in a forest. It is not simple to translate it to English. The same problem had also the priests who wrote Passeker in German written records or Pasecarius in the records written in Latin. I will try to explain the term. The landowners provided their serfs with the right to clear a part of their forest and to build a house there and to change the clearance into an arable field, or pasture. It happened, when villages, located in valleys (mainly in mountainous areas) were overpopulated, and there was no more plot and no more possibility for increasing population to find and secure living for themselves in a village itself. Who cleared a forest for themselves, were then called PASEKARs. The process of forest clearing was called "clearing colonization" and began in late 18th century. This PASEKA farm is typical for eastern regions of Moravia ( the Valachia, Beskydy Mountains).

PODSEDEK or PODSEDNIK (in German Untersasser or Podsedker). Peasant, his social-economical status was  between farmer and cottager. He hired plot by bigger farmer, unlike the farmers who were renters of the feudal landlords. Podsednik had up to 10 acres of arable fields, whereas big farmers, owned about 40 acres, i.e. +4x more.

RYCHTAR
Rychtar, sometimes also fojt or soltys in Czech, Richter, Vogt or Schultheiss in German, scultetus, judex or advocatus in Latin. The simple equivalent in English does not exist, therefore is often translated as a judge, mayor, reeve or bailiff.
All of it terms partly describing the meaning of the word RYCHTAR. Rychtar had to judge some smaller disputes of the villagers. Harder disputes and crimes were judged by the authorities of the dominium or by the professional judges.
RYCHTARs (fojts etc.) were not elected for the authority. They inherited or bought it.
Their house was called RYCHTA (or FOJTSTVI). RYCHTARs were very often the only ones in village with permission to have a pub. Therefore a lot of pubs in Czech villages are called NA RYCHTE or NA FOJTSTVI (at rychta, at fojtstvi) still.

Searching in vital registers

The vital registers were written in Latin, somewhen in Czech or in German.
I translated the German (and Czech) written records to English.
The oldest (catholic) vital registers where I searched for your ancestors (from Katerinice, Hostalkova and Ratibor) were vital registers of parish Przno (1684-1743).
After 1781 were established also protestant parishes at Ratibor and Hostalkova.
During my work I often used catholic vital registers also for searching data after 1781.
The reason was that birth (and also wedding and death) records of protestants were written until 1848 not only in protestant vital registers but had to be written also in catholic ones. For researching was better to use catholic vital registers what included indexes. Nevertheless, it sometimes happened that I did not find some missing records, there.
More complicated was situation in Zadverice where were missed not only some records but whole registeres.
I started the searching in Olomouc archive where are stored duplicates of Moravian catholic registers, since 1680s. Unfortunately I did not find older records from Zadverice than since 1777 and later (in parish Vizovice) there. I continued in Brno Archive to search in protestant vital registers of Zadverice (1848 and later) there. Protestant wedding registers of Zadverice (1812-1856) were also missed. In Brno I searched also in land records what sometimes helped me to find some names of older ancestors from Zadverice.

Numbers of  houses

In the time of Emperor Joseph II. this numbers introduced 1770 first. If a village/town had a chapel or church in 1770 they might have used that as a starting point for numbering but then you would expect the house numbers to follow one another in some sort of order.
Some houses were built between the old farms and needed also new numbers.

The origin of the surnames and various forms of spelling

This surnames is written in vital registers in various form of spelling. The spelling could be different but pronunciation was always the same. Reason is that some records is written in Latin, another in German and Czech.

Similar situation is spelling of firstnames.
Example:
Person who was born as Joannes (written in Latin), later had married as Johann (written in German)
and died as Jan (written in Czech).  There exists more similar situations Georg-Georius-Jiri (Jura),
Franz-Franciscus-Frantisek, Marina (Maryna)=Marianna, Mathias-Maczek, Venceslaus-Wenzel-Vaclav etc.

Ancient spelling Modern spelling Meaning
Baletka Baletka Means a ballet-dancer in Czech but I am not sure whether it is the word what is the surname originated from. In this area is also common a simillar surname GALETKA
Hurta Hurta Means ramble or attack in ancient Czech
Janota, Janotta, Janotik Janota Diminutive from name  Jan, i.e. John in English
Lomicza, Lomitza Lomica Originated from ancient Czech verb  lomit se, i.e. to fight in English
Mikeska, Mykeska Mikeska Diminutive from name  Mikula’sv, i.e. Nicolas in English.Since 1600s the most common suname at Zadverice
Nedbalek Nedba’lek Originated from the adjective nedbat, means negligent, negletful in English.
Pagaczv Paga’cv Means a muffin in Moravian dialects
Rzviczvan Rvi’cvan Originated from rveka or rvi’cvka (river or stream), means a person lived there
Schwabik, Schwabig, Schwabek Svva’bi’k Means a little person from Schwabenland (region in Bavaria, Germany), or  a little cockroach in Czech
Ssissa, Schischa, Schissa,Schischak Svisva Originated from the adjective svisvaty’, means conic in English, or from the word svisvka, means cone in English
Trubela Trubela Originated from German word Trubel (disquiet, unrest)
Wrba Vrba Means a willow tree in Czech.
Zubek, Zubiczvek, Zubik Zubek, Zubi’cvek, Zubi’k All the words means a little tooth in Czech



Kostohryz Section

Your ancestors came from southern Bohemia and were catholics. They were farmers, cottagers, blacksmiths etc. but one of your ancestral line belonged to lower nobility although in 17th century felt to the level of the farmers.
Your ancestors lived in the following villages:
Besice - in 1890 there lived in 35 houses 205 inhabitants of the Czech ethnicity.
Borovany – in 1890 there lived in 148 houses 1007 inhabitants of the Czech ethnicity. There was also mentioned church built in 14th century, chateau (former cloister), school and brewery. To Borovany belonged also Trocnov, birthplace of the famous hussite general Jan Zizka.
Dobronice - in 1890 there lived in 90 houses 534 inhabitants of the Czech ethnicity. There was also mentioned ruins of the castle built in 13th century and paper mill
Drazic - in 1890 there lived in 57 houses 417 inhabitants of the Czech ethnicity. There was also mentioned chateau, distillery, mill and stone pit
Chrenovice - in 1890 there lived in 57 houses 477 inhabitants of the Czech ethnicity. There was also mentioned church mentioned 12th century and ruins of the castle
Karlov - in 1890 there lived in 40 houses 236 inhabitants of the Czech ethnicity.
Nemejice - in 1890 there lived in 39 houses 218 inhabitants of the Czech ethnicity.
Pisecka Smolec- in 1900 there lived in 52 houses 380 inhabitants of the Czech ethnicity. There was also mentioned mill and stone pit
Podoli - in 1890 there lived in 60 houses 401 inhabitants of the Czech ethnicity. There was also mentioned stronghold mentioned in 1360 and school. Part of the village is called Rastary
Podolsko - in 1890 there lived in 20 houses 133 inhabitants of the Czech ethnicity. There was also mentioned mill and sawmill
Rakov - in 1890 there lived in 31 houses 182 inhabitants of the Czech ethnicity.

Occupations of your ancestors (and their godparents)

FARMER
Sedlak in Czech, Bauer or Grundbesitzer in German, rusticus in Latin. Farmers were also sorted by the area of the field (1 hide-, half hide- and quarter-hide-sized farmers)
Lanik, celolanik in Czech Lahner in German - 1 hide-sized farmer
Pullanik, pololanik in Czech Halblahner in German - half-hide-sized farmer
Ctvrtlanik in Czech Viertler in German - quarter-hide-sized farmer

COTTAGER
Chalupnik in Czech, Chaluppner in German, gazarius or domunculator in Latin.
Soil used by him was smaller than quarter of hide.

RYCHTAR
Rychtar, sometimes also fojt or soltys in Czech, Richter, Vogt or Schultheiss in German, scultetus or advocatus in Latin. The simple equivalent in English does not exist, therefore is often translated as a judge, mayor, reeve or bailiff.
All of it terms partly describing the meaning of the word RYCHTAR.
RYCHTARs (fojts etc.) were not elected for the authority. They inherited or bought it. When he inherited it he was written in German records also as Erbrichter.
In the head of  village were 1 fojt, purkmistr (1-2) and about 5 aldermen.

RYCHTARs house was called RYCHTA (or FOJTSTVI). RYCHTARs were very often the only ones in village with permission to have a pub. Therefore a lot of pubs in Czech villages are called NA RYCHTE or NA FOJTSTVI (at rychta, at fojtstvi) still.

VLADYKA
Could be translated as a knight to English.

Numbers of  houses

In the time of Emperor Joseph II. this numbers introduced 1770 first. If a village/town had a chapel or church in 1770 they might have used that as a starting point for numbering but then you would expect the house numbers to follow one another in some sort of order.
Some houses were built between the old farms and needed also new numbers.

The origin of the surnames and various forms of spelling

This surnames is written in vital registers in various form of spelling. The spelling could be different but pronunciation was always the same. Reason is that some records is written in Latin, another in German and Czech.

Similar situation is spelling of firstnames.
Example:
Person who was born as Joannes (written in Latin), later had married as Johann (written in German)
and died as Jan (written in Czech).  There exists more similar situations Georg-Georius-Jiri (Jura),
Franz-Franciscus-Frantisek, Marina (Maryna)=Marianna, Pavel-Paul, Venceslaus-Wenzel-Vaclav,
Wogtiech-Vojtech etc.

Ancient spelling Modern spelling Meaning
Andel Andiel, Angel Means angel in English
Bousvka Bartonv Originated from given name Bohusv
Ja’chym Jachym, Jachim Originated from given name Ja’chym (Joachim in English).
Jedlicvka Jedliczvka Means a little fir-tree in Czech112th most common Czech surname. In 1997 were 8 287 holders of the surname in the Czech Republic
Kola’rv Kolarzv Means whilwright in Czech24th most common Czech surname. In 1997 were 19 110 holders of the surname in the Czech Republic
Kosarv Kosarzv Means scythe-maker in Czech
Kostohryz Kostohriz This surname consists from 2 Czech wordsKost – bone Hryzat – to bit
Kottschmid? Kottschmid Originated from German word  Goldschmied(goldsmith in English)
Koudelka Kaudelka Originated from koudel – white hairy material made from flax. The surname could be originated as a nickname for tow-craftsman or for person who had tow-like hair. 220th most common Czech surname. In 1997 were 5 415 holders of the surname in the Czech Republic
Kozelka Kozelka Originated from word  koza(goat in English)
Marti’nek Martinek Diminutive from given name Martin158th most common Czech surname. In 1997 were 6 937 holders of the surname in the Czech Republic
Michalec Michalec Originated from given name Michal (Michael in English).
Rostenberger Rostenberger This surname consists from 2 German wordsRost – rust, rustyBerg – mountainRostenberger means a person living at place called Rostenberg
Soukup Saukup This surname consists from 2 Czech wordsSou – prefix what means together Kupec – means buyer47th most common Czech surname. In 1997 were 13 736 Soukups in the Czech Republic
Tvupa Tiupa Originated from archaic Czech verb tvupat- to cut the wood (by the axe) into small pieces
Tusva Tussa Originated from given name Tuchomir


end

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